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America's Great Migration

The Warmth of Other Suns: The Epic Story of America’s Great Migration

In The Warmth of Other Suns: The Epic Story of America’s Great Migration we learn that from 1915 to 1970, this exodus of almost six million people changed the face of America.   Isabel Wilkerson compares this epic migration to the migrations of other peoples in history. She interviewed more than a thousand people, and gained access to new data and official records, to write this definitive and vividly dramatic account of how these American journeys unfolded, altering our cities, our country, and ourselves. Read more…

Prisoners of Geography: Ten Maps That Explain Everything About the World

In this New York Times bestseller, an award-winning journalist uses ten maps of crucial regions to explain the geo-political strategies of the world powers—“fans of geography, history, and politics (and maps) will be enthralled” (Fort Worth Star-Telegram). Read more…

War in North Africa

An Army at Dawn: The War in North Africa, 1942-1943

An Army at Dawn is the first volume in a monumental trilogy about the liberation of Europe in WW II, and Pulitzer Prize winner Rick Atkinson begins with the riveting story of the war in North Africa.   The liberation of Europe and the destruction of the Third Reich is a story of courage and enduring triumph, of calamity and miscalculation. Read more…

History Of New York City

The Man with the Sawed-Off Leg and Other Tales of a New York City Block

The Man with the Sawed-Off Leg and Other Tales of a New York City Block brings to life the ghosts who inhabit that row of townhouses on Manhattan’s stately Riverside Drive for the first fifty years of the 20th Century, including a vicious crew of hoodlums who carried out what at the time was the largest armored car robbery in American history.   It was a daring, minutely planned exploit that ended in blood, when one of the gangsters accidentally shot himself. Read more…

Why It's So Hard for White People to Talk About Racism

White Fragility: Why It’s So Hard for White People to Talk About Racism

White Fragility: Why It’s So Hard for White People to Talk About Racism is a “vital, necessary, and beautiful book” says scholar Michael Eric Dyson. Author and antiracist educator Robin DiAngelo deftly illuminates the phenomenon of white fragility and “allows us to understand racism as a practice not restricted to ‘bad people’ (essayist Claudia Rankine).   Referring to the defensive moves that white people make when challenged racially, white fragility is characterized by emotions such as anger, fear, and guilt, and by behaviors including argumentation and silence. Read more…

History of Abolition

The Slave’s Cause: A History of Abolition

The Slave’s Cause: A History of Abolition questions the received historical wisdom that portrays abolitionists as bourgeois, mostly white reformers burdened by racial paternalism and economic conservatism.   Manisha Sinha overturns this image, broadening her scope beyond the antebellum period usually associated with abolitionism and recasting it as a radical social movement in which men and women, black and white, free and enslaved found common ground in causes ranging from feminism and utopian socialism to anti-imperialism and efforts to defend the rights of labor. Read more…

Hillary Clinton

Shattered: Inside Hillary Clinton’s Doomed Campaign

Shattered: Inside Hillary Clinton’s Doomed Campaign moves blow-by-blow from the campaign’s difficult birth through the bewildering terror of election night. Jonathan Allen and Amie Parnes tell  an unforgettable story with urgent lessons both political and personal, filled with revelations that will change the way readers understand just what happened to America on November 8, 2016.   It was never supposed to be this close. And of course she was supposed to win. How Hillary Clinton lost the 2016 election to Donald Trump is the tragic story of a sure thing gone off the rails. Read more…

John D. Rockefeller

Breaking Rockefeller: The Incredible Story of the Ambitious Rivals Who Toppled an Oil Empire

In Breaking Rockefeller we follow the rise of Marcus Samuel, Jr., an unorthodox Jewish merchant trader and Henri Deterding, a take-no-prisoners oilman. There lives become intertwined in 1889, with John D. Rockefeller at the peak of his power. Having annihilated all competition and possessing near-total domination of the market, even the U.S. government is wary of challenging the great “anaconda” of Standard Oil. The Standard never loses—that is until Samuel and Deterding team up to form Royal Dutch Shell. Read more…

World War I

The Sleepwalkers: How Europe Went to War in 1914

The Sleepwalkers: How Europe Went to War in 1914 by historian Christopher Clark is a riveting account of the explosive beginnings of World War I.   Drawing on new scholarship, Clark offers a fresh look at World War I, focusing not on the battles and atrocities of the war itself, but on the complex events and relationships that led a group of well-meaning leaders into brutal conflict.   Clark traces the paths to war in a minute-by-minute, action-packed narrative that cuts between the key decision centers in Vienna, Berlin, St. Read more…

Henry Kissinger

Henry Kissinger On China

On China is a sweeping and insightful history by Henry Kissinger who turns, for the first time, to a book length examination of  a country he has known intimately for decades and whose modern relations with the West he helped shape.   On China illuminates the inner workings of Chinese diplomacy during such pivotal events as the initial encounters between China and tight line modern European powers, the formation and breakdown of the Sino-Soviet alliance, the Korean War, and Richard Nixon’s historic trip to Beijing. Read more…