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America's Great Migration

The Warmth of Other Suns: The Epic Story of America’s Great Migration

In The Warmth of Other Suns: The Epic Story of America’s Great Migration we learn that from 1915 to 1970, this exodus of almost six million people changed the face of America.   Isabel Wilkerson compares this epic migration to the migrations of other peoples in history. She interviewed more than a thousand people, and gained access to new data and official records, to write this definitive and vividly dramatic account of how these American journeys unfolded, altering our cities, our country, and ourselves. Read more…

Why It's So Hard for White People to Talk About Racism

White Fragility: Why It’s So Hard for White People to Talk About Racism

White Fragility: Why It’s So Hard for White People to Talk About Racism is a “vital, necessary, and beautiful book” says scholar Michael Eric Dyson. Author and antiracist educator Robin DiAngelo deftly illuminates the phenomenon of white fragility and “allows us to understand racism as a practice not restricted to ‘bad people’ (essayist Claudia Rankine).   Referring to the defensive moves that white people make when challenged racially, white fragility is characterized by emotions such as anger, fear, and guilt, and by behaviors including argumentation and silence. Read more…

History of Abolition

The Slave’s Cause: A History of Abolition

The Slave’s Cause: A History of Abolition questions the received historical wisdom that portrays abolitionists as bourgeois, mostly white reformers burdened by racial paternalism and economic conservatism.   Manisha Sinha overturns this image, broadening her scope beyond the antebellum period usually associated with abolitionism and recasting it as a radical social movement in which men and women, black and white, free and enslaved found common ground in causes ranging from feminism and utopian socialism to anti-imperialism and efforts to defend the rights of labor. Read more…

Segregation in America

The Color of Law: A Forgotten History of How Our Government Segregated America

Widely heralded as a “masterful” (Washington Post) and “essential” (Slate) history of the modern American metropolis, The Color of Law by Richard Rothstein offers “the most forceful argument ever published on how federal, state, and local governments gave rise to and reinforced neighborhood segregation” (William Julius Wilson). Read more…